Abstract

An open discussion on their effectiveness for promoting multidisciplinary collaboration and community engagement The Maker movement represents a logical extension or synthesis of current trends in education, including active learning, problem based learning, team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and community-service learning. A variety of on-going efforts to build cross-departmental, active learning environments for students at UMass Amherst will be presented. The objectives of this work include engaging students in applied research, building safe spaces for exploring diversity issues, facilitating multi-level peer-to-peer support structures, and promoting community engagement. Examples will include discussion of a variety of makerspace courses, departmental/University traditional Makerspaces, and a Town-Gown Makerspace. The opportunities as well as challenges of such activities for supporting student growth and educational effectiveness will be discussed with active involvement of the Plymouth State faculty strongly encouraged.

Presentation Type

Event

Location

Hartman Union Building: Hage Room

Start Date

1-18-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

1-18-2017 2:15 PM

Description

Plenary

Streaming Media

maker courses 001.mp4 (207285 kB)
video part 2 of 4

maker courses 002.mp4 (1673 kB)
video part 3 of 4

maker courses 003.mp4 (44314 kB)
video part 4 of 4

MONO-000.zip (907106 kB)
audio only - .wav file

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Jan 18th, 1:15 PM Jan 18th, 2:15 PM

Collaborative Learning Spaces and Maker Courses

Hartman Union Building: Hage Room

An open discussion on their effectiveness for promoting multidisciplinary collaboration and community engagement The Maker movement represents a logical extension or synthesis of current trends in education, including active learning, problem based learning, team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and community-service learning. A variety of on-going efforts to build cross-departmental, active learning environments for students at UMass Amherst will be presented. The objectives of this work include engaging students in applied research, building safe spaces for exploring diversity issues, facilitating multi-level peer-to-peer support structures, and promoting community engagement. Examples will include discussion of a variety of makerspace courses, departmental/University traditional Makerspaces, and a Town-Gown Makerspace. The opportunities as well as challenges of such activities for supporting student growth and educational effectiveness will be discussed with active involvement of the Plymouth State faculty strongly encouraged.