Event Title

Start a Movement!

Location

Hartman Union Building Court Room

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

The Start A Movement cluster project was submitted to the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Cluster by Denise Normandin, a Plymouth State University staff member and graduate degree candidate ‘17 in Personal and Organizational Wellness from the Department of Counselor Education and School Psychology.

Physical inactivity significantly increases the risk of chronic disease. There is abundant data on health promotion and the promotion of physical activity for overall health and well-being. Initiatives to increase social support for physical activity within organizations and communities, including school sites and worksites can effectively promote physical activity.

Social support in community settings is an example of a strategy that capitalizes on social networks to reinforce physical activity behavior. Behavioral and social approaches include creation of buddy systems, behavioral contracts between participants and program leaders. Low levels of physical activity among young adults remains a serious nationwide problem, with 69% of Americans 18 to 24 years of age failing to meet the federal guidelines for physical activity in 2014 (National Center for Health Statistics, 2015). However, there is insufficient knowledge about why online networks might be effective sources of social influence for improving physical activity levels, which is why this project/study is very timely and relevant.

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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM Apr 28th, 5:00 PM

Start a Movement!

Hartman Union Building Court Room

The Start A Movement cluster project was submitted to the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Cluster by Denise Normandin, a Plymouth State University staff member and graduate degree candidate ‘17 in Personal and Organizational Wellness from the Department of Counselor Education and School Psychology.

Physical inactivity significantly increases the risk of chronic disease. There is abundant data on health promotion and the promotion of physical activity for overall health and well-being. Initiatives to increase social support for physical activity within organizations and communities, including school sites and worksites can effectively promote physical activity.

Social support in community settings is an example of a strategy that capitalizes on social networks to reinforce physical activity behavior. Behavioral and social approaches include creation of buddy systems, behavioral contracts between participants and program leaders. Low levels of physical activity among young adults remains a serious nationwide problem, with 69% of Americans 18 to 24 years of age failing to meet the federal guidelines for physical activity in 2014 (National Center for Health Statistics, 2015). However, there is insufficient knowledge about why online networks might be effective sources of social influence for improving physical activity levels, which is why this project/study is very timely and relevant.