Event Title

Assessment of Mayfly, Stonefly and Caddisfly Families in Relation to Chloride Levels in NH Streams

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Amy Villamagna

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

Abstract

While applying sodium chloride is an effective way of managing road ice and reducing incidences of car crashes, it can be detrimental to aquatic ecosystems which include macroinvertebrates and other organisms. The benthic macroinvertebrate orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) are considered indicators of high quality water due to their sensitivity to stressors. The objectives of this research is to determine average EPT % community composition and total family abundance in correlation to chloride levels. We collected macroinvertebrates from 10 stream sites throughout central and southern New Hampshire. Samples were taken from each site monthly, from May through October and macroinvertebrates were identified to the family level and enumerated. Water samples which were tested for chloride levels, were also collected during each site visit. A linear regression line was run to compare EPT % community composition and total abundance between kick net and rock basket samples. Results suggest that sites with lower chloride levels have greater EPT abundance/% community composition but are not significant. This study may serve as an indicator of the early impacts chloride from road salts could have on aquatic ecosystems.

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Assessment of Mayfly, Stonefly and Caddisfly Families in Relation to Chloride Levels in NH Streams

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

While applying sodium chloride is an effective way of managing road ice and reducing incidences of car crashes, it can be detrimental to aquatic ecosystems which include macroinvertebrates and other organisms. The benthic macroinvertebrate orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) are considered indicators of high quality water due to their sensitivity to stressors. The objectives of this research is to determine average EPT % community composition and total family abundance in correlation to chloride levels. We collected macroinvertebrates from 10 stream sites throughout central and southern New Hampshire. Samples were taken from each site monthly, from May through October and macroinvertebrates were identified to the family level and enumerated. Water samples which were tested for chloride levels, were also collected during each site visit. A linear regression line was run to compare EPT % community composition and total abundance between kick net and rock basket samples. Results suggest that sites with lower chloride levels have greater EPT abundance/% community composition but are not significant. This study may serve as an indicator of the early impacts chloride from road salts could have on aquatic ecosystems.