Event Title

New Hampshire Gastrointestinal Illness and Water Systems Analysis

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Amy Villamagna

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

Abstract

At the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services, the Infectious Disease Surveillance Section monitors gastrointestinal illness (GI). The goal of this project was to evaluate gastrointestinal illness (GI) rates among individuals on public water systems and those on private wells across New Hampshire. In order to do this, we created a high-quality, high-resolution base layer using GI data. Over 5,000 cases of enteric diseases were extracted from the New Hampshire Electronic Disease Surveillance System from 2004 to 2013. Using ArcGIS, these GI points were combined with a shapefile of New Hampshire’s public water system boundaries. Using the public water system boundary, we determined whether GI cases were on a public water system or a private well. Preliminary results suggest that there is significant variability in GI rates and that rates may be higher among those on public water. As a sensitivity analysis, we explored the impact of different size buffers around the public water system boundary. The number of cases and disease rates were recalculated using 50m and 100m buffers to account for any discrepancies in water system boundaries. Our goal is to understand the impact of drinking water source on the risk of GI-related illness.

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

New Hampshire Gastrointestinal Illness and Water Systems Analysis

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

At the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services, the Infectious Disease Surveillance Section monitors gastrointestinal illness (GI). The goal of this project was to evaluate gastrointestinal illness (GI) rates among individuals on public water systems and those on private wells across New Hampshire. In order to do this, we created a high-quality, high-resolution base layer using GI data. Over 5,000 cases of enteric diseases were extracted from the New Hampshire Electronic Disease Surveillance System from 2004 to 2013. Using ArcGIS, these GI points were combined with a shapefile of New Hampshire’s public water system boundaries. Using the public water system boundary, we determined whether GI cases were on a public water system or a private well. Preliminary results suggest that there is significant variability in GI rates and that rates may be higher among those on public water. As a sensitivity analysis, we explored the impact of different size buffers around the public water system boundary. The number of cases and disease rates were recalculated using 50m and 100m buffers to account for any discrepancies in water system boundaries. Our goal is to understand the impact of drinking water source on the risk of GI-related illness.