Event Title

Net Radiation Models for Katabatic and Anabatic Wind Transitions at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF)

Presenter Information

Cody Poche, Applied Meteorology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Eric Kelsey

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

This study examined net radiation values to determine whether a threshold value could be found that would predict when katabatic (anabatic) winds will transition to anabatic (katabatic) winds. Data from Soil Climate Analyst Network (SCAN) site at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, USA during June – September from 2009 to 2015 was used for this study. Three models were developed and examined for this study. The first model calculates net radiation and resulted in significant error that came from the assumptions of atmospheric conditions due to the lack of data at the SCAN site. Therefore, a second model was developed examining only incoming shortwave radiation observed at the SCAN site. Incoming shortwave radiation seemed to drive the transitions and is the most variable of the net radiation terms throughout a 24-hour period. However, trees obscure the SCAN site, blocking direct incoming shortwave radiation. Therefore, a third model was developed that adopted the methodology from Stull’s (1988) model, which calculates incoming shortwave radiation at HBEF. The second model that was used performed the best. This model produced the most consistent values and had the least amount of assumptions. The tree canopy did not significantly affect the observations.

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Apr 28th, 4:00 PM Apr 28th, 5:00 PM

Net Radiation Models for Katabatic and Anabatic Wind Transitions at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF)

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

This study examined net radiation values to determine whether a threshold value could be found that would predict when katabatic (anabatic) winds will transition to anabatic (katabatic) winds. Data from Soil Climate Analyst Network (SCAN) site at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, USA during June – September from 2009 to 2015 was used for this study. Three models were developed and examined for this study. The first model calculates net radiation and resulted in significant error that came from the assumptions of atmospheric conditions due to the lack of data at the SCAN site. Therefore, a second model was developed examining only incoming shortwave radiation observed at the SCAN site. Incoming shortwave radiation seemed to drive the transitions and is the most variable of the net radiation terms throughout a 24-hour period. However, trees obscure the SCAN site, blocking direct incoming shortwave radiation. Therefore, a third model was developed that adopted the methodology from Stull’s (1988) model, which calculates incoming shortwave radiation at HBEF. The second model that was used performed the best. This model produced the most consistent values and had the least amount of assumptions. The tree canopy did not significantly affect the observations.