Event Title

Variants in the Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene and Their Cardiovascular Disease Risk Association

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Heather Doherty

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease accounts for 1 in every 4 deaths in the United States. Causes of cardiovascular disease include diabetes, chronic high blood pressure, and heart attack. Following a heart attack, damage to the myocardial tissue leads to scarring, known as cardiac fibrosis. A scar is formed when excess extracellular matrix (ECM) is deposited causing cell death. Cardiac fibrosis alters electrical activity and elasticity, causing cardiac dysfunction. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a gene involved in healthy wound healing and repair following injury. Naturally occurring variants in CTGF have been shown to influence fibrotic risk. DNA from volunteers at Plymouth State University was collected, sequenced, and analyzed for the presence of variants in CTGF. Volunteers also completed, a family history survey including incidence of cardiovascular risk factors in relatives. Association of variants to cardiovascular disease was performed using a Kendall’s Tau b test. To date, we have detected 6 novel and 11 previously published variants for a total of 17 in our sample population. One variant is correlated with a decreased family history of cardiovascular disease and may impact fibrosis. In the future, understanding the impact of CTGF variants may be used to develop individualized treatment plans post heart attack.

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Apr 28th, 4:00 PM Apr 28th, 5:00 PM

Variants in the Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene and Their Cardiovascular Disease Risk Association

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Cardiovascular disease accounts for 1 in every 4 deaths in the United States. Causes of cardiovascular disease include diabetes, chronic high blood pressure, and heart attack. Following a heart attack, damage to the myocardial tissue leads to scarring, known as cardiac fibrosis. A scar is formed when excess extracellular matrix (ECM) is deposited causing cell death. Cardiac fibrosis alters electrical activity and elasticity, causing cardiac dysfunction. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a gene involved in healthy wound healing and repair following injury. Naturally occurring variants in CTGF have been shown to influence fibrotic risk. DNA from volunteers at Plymouth State University was collected, sequenced, and analyzed for the presence of variants in CTGF. Volunteers also completed, a family history survey including incidence of cardiovascular risk factors in relatives. Association of variants to cardiovascular disease was performed using a Kendall’s Tau b test. To date, we have detected 6 novel and 11 previously published variants for a total of 17 in our sample population. One variant is correlated with a decreased family history of cardiovascular disease and may impact fibrosis. In the future, understanding the impact of CTGF variants may be used to develop individualized treatment plans post heart attack.