Event Title

Landscape Level Habitat Characteristics for Predicting the Presence of the Northern Long-eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis)

Presenter Information

Keith VanGorden, Biology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kerry Yurewicz

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

In May 2015 the northern long-eared bat, Myotis septentrionalis, became the first bat species to be listed as Threatened via the Endangered Species Act due to the wildlife disease known as white nose syndrome. The species, which had been in decline for a number of years, then became an elevated concern for every wildlife manager in the eastern United States and was of particular concern to the timber industry. The goal of my research project was to better understand this species’ distribution in the White Mountain National Forest by statistically testing for associations between detections of M. septentrionalis and habitat variables. Three years of presence/absence echolocation surveys starting in 2014 and ending in 2016 were conducted in northern New Hampshire and Western Maine, with M. septentrionalis detected in 27 out of 333 survey sites. Stand-level habitat characteristics were examined using logistic regression to determine which characteristics could be used as predictors for M. septentrionalis presence on the landscape. The average diameter at breast height of a forest stand and the number of hectares of wetlands within 2 km appear to be landscape-level characteristics that influence the presence of M. septentrionalis on the landscape.

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Apr 28th, 4:00 PM Apr 28th, 5:00 PM

Landscape Level Habitat Characteristics for Predicting the Presence of the Northern Long-eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis)

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

In May 2015 the northern long-eared bat, Myotis septentrionalis, became the first bat species to be listed as Threatened via the Endangered Species Act due to the wildlife disease known as white nose syndrome. The species, which had been in decline for a number of years, then became an elevated concern for every wildlife manager in the eastern United States and was of particular concern to the timber industry. The goal of my research project was to better understand this species’ distribution in the White Mountain National Forest by statistically testing for associations between detections of M. septentrionalis and habitat variables. Three years of presence/absence echolocation surveys starting in 2014 and ending in 2016 were conducted in northern New Hampshire and Western Maine, with M. septentrionalis detected in 27 out of 333 survey sites. Stand-level habitat characteristics were examined using logistic regression to determine which characteristics could be used as predictors for M. septentrionalis presence on the landscape. The average diameter at breast height of a forest stand and the number of hectares of wetlands within 2 km appear to be landscape-level characteristics that influence the presence of M. septentrionalis on the landscape.