Event Title

The Effects of Mindfulness Instructions on Emotion Regulation

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kathleen Herzig

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

Mindfulness is the ability to be fully present and aware of the current moment. It also involves accepting what is currently happening and how you are feeling, and not being overly reactive to it. Mindfulness is associated with adaptive emotion regulation skills; however, it remains unclear whether practicing mindfulness skills leads to better emotion regulation. Some studies have shown that participants exposed to a mindfulness training experienced greater positive emotions and greater negative emotions than those in a control condition. It is possible that mindfulness instructions without a mindfulness training might be enough to influence emotion regulation. The purpose of the current study is to test this hypothesis. Participants completed questionnaires about mindfulness and emotion regulation. Then they were randomized to listen to a recording of a mindfulness training with mindfulness instructions, a control recording (about gardening) with mindfulness instructions or just the control recording. Next participants watched a film clip intended to induce positive or negative emotions, rated their emotions, and after a 3-minute rest period rated their emotions again. This process was repeated with whichever clip (positive or negative) they did not see the first time. Preliminary results will be presented.

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Apr 28th, 4:00 PM Apr 28th, 5:00 PM

The Effects of Mindfulness Instructions on Emotion Regulation

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Mindfulness is the ability to be fully present and aware of the current moment. It also involves accepting what is currently happening and how you are feeling, and not being overly reactive to it. Mindfulness is associated with adaptive emotion regulation skills; however, it remains unclear whether practicing mindfulness skills leads to better emotion regulation. Some studies have shown that participants exposed to a mindfulness training experienced greater positive emotions and greater negative emotions than those in a control condition. It is possible that mindfulness instructions without a mindfulness training might be enough to influence emotion regulation. The purpose of the current study is to test this hypothesis. Participants completed questionnaires about mindfulness and emotion regulation. Then they were randomized to listen to a recording of a mindfulness training with mindfulness instructions, a control recording (about gardening) with mindfulness instructions or just the control recording. Next participants watched a film clip intended to induce positive or negative emotions, rated their emotions, and after a 3-minute rest period rated their emotions again. This process was repeated with whichever clip (positive or negative) they did not see the first time. Preliminary results will be presented.