Event Title

A Rapid Assessment of Breeding Productivity for the Canada Warbler

Presenter Information

Christian Burns, Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Leonard Reitsma

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Breeding productivity is the number of offspring produced by a population annually. Assessing productivity can be time intensive, or lacking in demographic and habitat information. An efficient, comprehensive measure of productivity is needed, and could inform conservation efforts for declining Neotropical migratory species such as the Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis). This project tests a rapid method for assessing productivity across habitat types for this species. This study took place in Canaan, New Hampshire on two plots that are part of a long-term population study and 3 additional plots. Males were aged and banded on each plot. To assess breeding success, sites were revisited once fledging occurred on the long-term plots. A male was considered having successfully fledged young if food provisioning or a fledgling was observed. If no provisioning adult or fledgling was observed, the male was considered unsuccessful. Habitat characteristics were also recorded per site. The captures and analyses were performed within two field days per plot, by two researchers. Older males fledged more young than younger males and successful males were in denser shrub-level vegetation. In 2017, this assessment will be applied to populations throughout the Canada Warbler’s breeding range, collecting conservation-relevant information on a continental scale.

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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

A Rapid Assessment of Breeding Productivity for the Canada Warbler

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Breeding productivity is the number of offspring produced by a population annually. Assessing productivity can be time intensive, or lacking in demographic and habitat information. An efficient, comprehensive measure of productivity is needed, and could inform conservation efforts for declining Neotropical migratory species such as the Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis). This project tests a rapid method for assessing productivity across habitat types for this species. This study took place in Canaan, New Hampshire on two plots that are part of a long-term population study and 3 additional plots. Males were aged and banded on each plot. To assess breeding success, sites were revisited once fledging occurred on the long-term plots. A male was considered having successfully fledged young if food provisioning or a fledgling was observed. If no provisioning adult or fledgling was observed, the male was considered unsuccessful. Habitat characteristics were also recorded per site. The captures and analyses were performed within two field days per plot, by two researchers. Older males fledged more young than younger males and successful males were in denser shrub-level vegetation. In 2017, this assessment will be applied to populations throughout the Canada Warbler’s breeding range, collecting conservation-relevant information on a continental scale.