Event Title

Does Talking about Worries Ever Increase Anxiety? The Relationship of Dyadic Worry, and Mood

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kathleen Herzig

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Generally, talking about concerns with our friends is considered beneficial. However, recent evidence shows that sometimes talking about worries can increase anxiety. For example, dyadic worry occurs when two people talk about and focus on their worries in a non-productive way. Dyadic worry often centers on fears of potential future negative events and their consequences and fear that the person will not be able to manage these scenarios. Research supports the idea that dyadic worry is related to symptoms of depression and anxiety. This study looks at the relationships between dyadic worry, anxiety, depression, mood, and other topics affecting college aged students. Participants first complete self-report measures on these topics and are then asked to worry as hard as they can for eight minutes with a friend. These sessions are video recorded. Afterwards, students are given self-report measures on their current mood and anxiety levels. Dyadic worry is expected to be related to increased levels of self-reported anxiety, symptoms of depression, and negative mood. Results of data collected in the Spring 2017 semester will be presented.

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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Does Talking about Worries Ever Increase Anxiety? The Relationship of Dyadic Worry, and Mood

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Generally, talking about concerns with our friends is considered beneficial. However, recent evidence shows that sometimes talking about worries can increase anxiety. For example, dyadic worry occurs when two people talk about and focus on their worries in a non-productive way. Dyadic worry often centers on fears of potential future negative events and their consequences and fear that the person will not be able to manage these scenarios. Research supports the idea that dyadic worry is related to symptoms of depression and anxiety. This study looks at the relationships between dyadic worry, anxiety, depression, mood, and other topics affecting college aged students. Participants first complete self-report measures on these topics and are then asked to worry as hard as they can for eight minutes with a friend. These sessions are video recorded. Afterwards, students are given self-report measures on their current mood and anxiety levels. Dyadic worry is expected to be related to increased levels of self-reported anxiety, symptoms of depression, and negative mood. Results of data collected in the Spring 2017 semester will be presented.