Event Title

Generation and Memory: A Transfer-Appropriate Processing Approach

Presenter Information

Jason PhillipsFollow

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Angela Kilb

Location

Hartman Union Building Court Room

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

Associative memory is the memory for things related to items or events, requiring a mental connection between the different items. One way that researchers have increased memory performance is with the generation effect. The generation effect is the finding that generating information in a stimulus at study, such as filling in the blanks in a fragmented word – for example, complete the word: res_a_ch (research) – creates better memory for stimuli at test than simply reading the stimulus. Much previous research on the generation effect has targeted item memory improvement. The effects of generation on associative memory have been varied in the few experiments that examined it; some reported improvement, others found significant decreases. This experiment is an adjustment of a previous experiment that sought to examine the effect of generation on associative memory. Participants were asked to memorize pairs of unrelated words in which some were complete and some were fragmented for generation. The first study found no improvement in associative memory from generation. The current study has adjusted to a transfer-appropriate processing theory of memory in which the task relies on the associative processing to generate words. Results will be presented on the poster.

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Apr 28th, 4:00 PM Apr 28th, 5:00 PM

Generation and Memory: A Transfer-Appropriate Processing Approach

Hartman Union Building Court Room

Associative memory is the memory for things related to items or events, requiring a mental connection between the different items. One way that researchers have increased memory performance is with the generation effect. The generation effect is the finding that generating information in a stimulus at study, such as filling in the blanks in a fragmented word – for example, complete the word: res_a_ch (research) – creates better memory for stimuli at test than simply reading the stimulus. Much previous research on the generation effect has targeted item memory improvement. The effects of generation on associative memory have been varied in the few experiments that examined it; some reported improvement, others found significant decreases. This experiment is an adjustment of a previous experiment that sought to examine the effect of generation on associative memory. Participants were asked to memorize pairs of unrelated words in which some were complete and some were fragmented for generation. The first study found no improvement in associative memory from generation. The current study has adjusted to a transfer-appropriate processing theory of memory in which the task relies on the associative processing to generate words. Results will be presented on the poster.