Event Title

Probing the Sugar-Signaling Pathway and Insulin Resistance via RNAi

Presenter Information

Vahid Kheirollah, Biology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Susan Swope

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

Abstract

The number of individuals affected by chronic diseases is increasing exponentially, and the aim of this study is to look at the mechanism of a gene that triggers chronic diseases such as diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (ogt) gene is associated with the development of chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). The OGT protein catalyzes the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine to serine and threonine residues on proteins. The ogt gene in humans is homologous to ogt-1 in C. elegans, which we silenced by RNAi. We first determined the homologous gene sequence in C. elegans, designed a primer to amplify a portion of this gene, and then inserted the gene into a vector designed to produce double-stranded RNA. The vector was inserted into the E. coli strain HT115[DE3] to produce the feeding strain for RNAi. Many O-GlcNAcylated proteins are associated with stress responses and energy metabolism. Although deletion of the ogt gene in mice results in cell death and lethality, deletion of the ogt gene in C. elegans produce viable worms. This system can therefore be used to study changes associated with energy metabolism that may have important implications for human health.

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Probing the Sugar-Signaling Pathway and Insulin Resistance via RNAi

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

The number of individuals affected by chronic diseases is increasing exponentially, and the aim of this study is to look at the mechanism of a gene that triggers chronic diseases such as diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (ogt) gene is associated with the development of chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). The OGT protein catalyzes the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine to serine and threonine residues on proteins. The ogt gene in humans is homologous to ogt-1 in C. elegans, which we silenced by RNAi. We first determined the homologous gene sequence in C. elegans, designed a primer to amplify a portion of this gene, and then inserted the gene into a vector designed to produce double-stranded RNA. The vector was inserted into the E. coli strain HT115[DE3] to produce the feeding strain for RNAi. Many O-GlcNAcylated proteins are associated with stress responses and energy metabolism. Although deletion of the ogt gene in mice results in cell death and lethality, deletion of the ogt gene in C. elegans produce viable worms. This system can therefore be used to study changes associated with energy metabolism that may have important implications for human health.