Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kathleen Norris

Location

Hartman Union Building Court Room

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

The NH Early Learning Standards, adopted 2015, contain over 550 progress indicators in five learning domains from birth through age 5, and include the NH Kindergarten Readiness indicators. This is a daunting amount of information for early childhood educators to consolidate, especially considering that appropriate assessment for the youngest learners differs significantly from assessment practices for older children. Their physical, social and academic development is highly varied and children are very likely to reach milestones well before, or well after, the average age of expectancy, but still fall within normal progression parameters. The formidable task of actively using NHELS means EC educators must recognize every indicator of progress, for every child, throughout the events of every day, and record them as they happen. My goal was to build a tool that would make this possible. The spreadsheet I constructed matches each NHELS indicator of progress to activities from the Montessori EC curriculum, creating observable assessment opportunities. These are organized into progressive quarterly curriculum design suggestions. Drop down boxes facilitate the recording of achieved skills and identify their appropriate NHELS learning domain. A report page generates individual information for each student, providing opportunities for frequent distribution of information to parents.

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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Best Practice Early Childhood Education Assessment System Incorporating NH Early Learning Standards

Hartman Union Building Court Room

The NH Early Learning Standards, adopted 2015, contain over 550 progress indicators in five learning domains from birth through age 5, and include the NH Kindergarten Readiness indicators. This is a daunting amount of information for early childhood educators to consolidate, especially considering that appropriate assessment for the youngest learners differs significantly from assessment practices for older children. Their physical, social and academic development is highly varied and children are very likely to reach milestones well before, or well after, the average age of expectancy, but still fall within normal progression parameters. The formidable task of actively using NHELS means EC educators must recognize every indicator of progress, for every child, throughout the events of every day, and record them as they happen. My goal was to build a tool that would make this possible. The spreadsheet I constructed matches each NHELS indicator of progress to activities from the Montessori EC curriculum, creating observable assessment opportunities. These are organized into progressive quarterly curriculum design suggestions. Drop down boxes facilitate the recording of achieved skills and identify their appropriate NHELS learning domain. A report page generates individual information for each student, providing opportunities for frequent distribution of information to parents.