Event Title

Air and Stream Temperature Relationships and Influence on Macroinvertebrate Communities in New Hampshire

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Amy Villamagna

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

Abstract

With continuing global and regional climate change, air temperature in NH is forecast to continue rising over the next century. There is a direct positive correlation between air temperature and water temperature and high water temperature is a stressor on aquatic biota. The purpose of this study was to observe and analyze the relationships between air and water temperature in NH streams and the effect this has on the abundance of thermally sensitive aquatic macroinvertebrates. This was accomplished by collecting air and water temperature data at ten streams across central and southern NH. Aquatic macroinvertebrate samples were collected at the same ten sites. Sampling took place from May - October 2016 with kick netting and rock basket methods at each site. Macroinvertebrates were identified to the family level. The air and water temperature datasets were then paired and a linear regression model was run (R2 range = 0.39-0.95). A linear regression model was also run to assess the effect of water temperature on thermally sensitive families and orders of macroinvertebrates. There is weak evidence of the expected relationship.

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Air and Stream Temperature Relationships and Influence on Macroinvertebrate Communities in New Hampshire

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

With continuing global and regional climate change, air temperature in NH is forecast to continue rising over the next century. There is a direct positive correlation between air temperature and water temperature and high water temperature is a stressor on aquatic biota. The purpose of this study was to observe and analyze the relationships between air and water temperature in NH streams and the effect this has on the abundance of thermally sensitive aquatic macroinvertebrates. This was accomplished by collecting air and water temperature data at ten streams across central and southern NH. Aquatic macroinvertebrate samples were collected at the same ten sites. Sampling took place from May - October 2016 with kick netting and rock basket methods at each site. Macroinvertebrates were identified to the family level. The air and water temperature datasets were then paired and a linear regression model was run (R2 range = 0.39-0.95). A linear regression model was also run to assess the effect of water temperature on thermally sensitive families and orders of macroinvertebrates. There is weak evidence of the expected relationship.