Event Title

Participant Response to Research on Bystander Training for Sexual Assault

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kathleen Herzig

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 4:00 PM

Abstract

Sexual violence is a major problem on college campuses. Research on trauma and sex related topics has increased as has concern from IRBs that this type of research could distress participants or cause psychological harm. Research has found that a small percent of participants in sex and trauma related research experienced short-lived distress. However, few studies have evaluated the response of participants to bystander programs. The present study sought to evaluate the effect of participating in a study evaluating the effectiveness of a video on bystander behavior. Participants completed self-report measures on their experiences with sexual violence and their current mood. Then participants were randomized by class to watch either the bystander prevention video, TakeCARE, or a study skills video. Afterwards, participants completed self-­report measures on mood and reactions to research. The current study found that participants who viewed the bystander prevention video reported more personal benefits to participating in the study and more emotional reactions than those who watched the study skills video. Survivors in general did not respond differently to participating in the study than non-victimized participants. This study provides important information for IRBs and researchers to use when determining the risk involved with sexual assault related research.

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Participant Response to Research on Bystander Training for Sexual Assault

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Sexual violence is a major problem on college campuses. Research on trauma and sex related topics has increased as has concern from IRBs that this type of research could distress participants or cause psychological harm. Research has found that a small percent of participants in sex and trauma related research experienced short-lived distress. However, few studies have evaluated the response of participants to bystander programs. The present study sought to evaluate the effect of participating in a study evaluating the effectiveness of a video on bystander behavior. Participants completed self-report measures on their experiences with sexual violence and their current mood. Then participants were randomized by class to watch either the bystander prevention video, TakeCARE, or a study skills video. Afterwards, participants completed self-­report measures on mood and reactions to research. The current study found that participants who viewed the bystander prevention video reported more personal benefits to participating in the study and more emotional reactions than those who watched the study skills video. Survivors in general did not respond differently to participating in the study than non-victimized participants. This study provides important information for IRBs and researchers to use when determining the risk involved with sexual assault related research.