Event Title

Picture Books as an Introduction to Museum Collections

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Clarissa Uttley

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

Throughout my graduate work I have examined the ways in which children’s picture books can be used as an introduction to complex concepts, primarily focusing on using these narratives to discuss Art History and Theory, given my personal background in those subjects. Narrative is well-documented as a powerful tool for both conveying and retaining information, and when this is combined with the compelling and often subtle imagery that is present in illustrated picture books even difficult and abstract concepts can be understood by a young audience. This past summer I was fortunate enough to intern with the Education Department at the Currier Museum of Art, and assisted with the formative planning process for a children’s book about the Museum’s collection. While that project is taken further into the production process, I have written a tentative sequel with the approval and oversight of my internship mentor. Given the importance of visuals to the narrative functioning of a picture book, I have also created a full storyboard and several concept illustrations. It is my hope that, regardless of whether this story is ultimately used by the Currier, it will assist them as they continue creating educational narratives for their youngest patrons.

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May 3rd, 4:00 PM May 3rd, 5:00 PM

Picture Books as an Introduction to Museum Collections

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Throughout my graduate work I have examined the ways in which children’s picture books can be used as an introduction to complex concepts, primarily focusing on using these narratives to discuss Art History and Theory, given my personal background in those subjects. Narrative is well-documented as a powerful tool for both conveying and retaining information, and when this is combined with the compelling and often subtle imagery that is present in illustrated picture books even difficult and abstract concepts can be understood by a young audience. This past summer I was fortunate enough to intern with the Education Department at the Currier Museum of Art, and assisted with the formative planning process for a children’s book about the Museum’s collection. While that project is taken further into the production process, I have written a tentative sequel with the approval and oversight of my internship mentor. Given the importance of visuals to the narrative functioning of a picture book, I have also created a full storyboard and several concept illustrations. It is my hope that, regardless of whether this story is ultimately used by the Currier, it will assist them as they continue creating educational narratives for their youngest patrons.