Presenter Information

Taylor Bridges, Nursing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Sandra Van Gundy

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

As total joint arthroplasties become more common, so too do the complications of the procedure, such as surgical site infections (SSI). When considering causative factors, it came to light that different dressings were being used for these surgical incisions. A literature review was conducted to determine the efficacy of standard gauze dressings compared to hydrofiber dressings to reduce the incidence of SSI. The results indicate that occlusive hydrofiber dressings independently reduce the rate of SSI. Research also shows that variables such as blistering and number of dressing changes required in a postoperative period are wound complications and risk factors for the development of SSI. Any skin breakdown surrounding a wound provides additional portals of entry for pathogens. Similarly, changing a dressing more frequently exposes the surgical site and increases the chances of contamination by bacteria. The study findings indicate that occlusive hydrofiber dressings, such as Aquacel and Mepilex Border, are superior dressings and aid in reducing dressing changes, wound blistering, and SSI in postoperative total joint arthroplasty patients. The evidence supports the recommendation of using occlusive hydrofiber dressings for total joint arthroplasty incisions.

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May 3rd, 4:00 PM May 3rd, 5:00 PM

Reducing Total Joint Replacement Surgical Site Infections: A Comparison of Two Dressings

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

As total joint arthroplasties become more common, so too do the complications of the procedure, such as surgical site infections (SSI). When considering causative factors, it came to light that different dressings were being used for these surgical incisions. A literature review was conducted to determine the efficacy of standard gauze dressings compared to hydrofiber dressings to reduce the incidence of SSI. The results indicate that occlusive hydrofiber dressings independently reduce the rate of SSI. Research also shows that variables such as blistering and number of dressing changes required in a postoperative period are wound complications and risk factors for the development of SSI. Any skin breakdown surrounding a wound provides additional portals of entry for pathogens. Similarly, changing a dressing more frequently exposes the surgical site and increases the chances of contamination by bacteria. The study findings indicate that occlusive hydrofiber dressings, such as Aquacel and Mepilex Border, are superior dressings and aid in reducing dressing changes, wound blistering, and SSI in postoperative total joint arthroplasty patients. The evidence supports the recommendation of using occlusive hydrofiber dressings for total joint arthroplasty incisions.