Event Title

Can People Ignore False Feedback When Making Relative Judgments?

Presenter Information

Alexandra Lugar, Psychology, Law

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Angela Kilb

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

Individuals tend to evaluate themselves as being better-than-average (BTA) on tasks that seem easy and worse-than-average (WTA) on tasks that are considered difficult (Moore & Kim, 2003; Moore & Small, 2007; Rose & Windschitl, 2008). However, recent work (Kilb & Moore, in preparation) has shown that bogus feedback from a computer can override perceptions of difficulty. Specifically, negative feedback can reduce people’s judgments of their own relative performance even when tasks are perceived as easy, and positive feedback can increase relative judgments even when tasks are perceived as difficult. The purpose of the current experiment is to determine whether the effects of bogus feedback can be replicated when participants are explicitly told that their feedback is inaccurate. The experiment consisted of three phases. In phase 1, participants were shown a list of 48 concrete (easy) and abstract (difficult) words and asked how well they are able to define them compared to all the other participants in the study. In phase 2, participants were asked to define each of the words and to provide their relative ratings for each word a second time. In phase 3, participants were shown inaccurate feedback for their definitions for each of the words.

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May 3rd, 4:00 PM May 3rd, 5:00 PM

Can People Ignore False Feedback When Making Relative Judgments?

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Individuals tend to evaluate themselves as being better-than-average (BTA) on tasks that seem easy and worse-than-average (WTA) on tasks that are considered difficult (Moore & Kim, 2003; Moore & Small, 2007; Rose & Windschitl, 2008). However, recent work (Kilb & Moore, in preparation) has shown that bogus feedback from a computer can override perceptions of difficulty. Specifically, negative feedback can reduce people’s judgments of their own relative performance even when tasks are perceived as easy, and positive feedback can increase relative judgments even when tasks are perceived as difficult. The purpose of the current experiment is to determine whether the effects of bogus feedback can be replicated when participants are explicitly told that their feedback is inaccurate. The experiment consisted of three phases. In phase 1, participants were shown a list of 48 concrete (easy) and abstract (difficult) words and asked how well they are able to define them compared to all the other participants in the study. In phase 2, participants were asked to define each of the words and to provide their relative ratings for each word a second time. In phase 3, participants were shown inaccurate feedback for their definitions for each of the words.