Event Title

The Effects of Parental Education on Decision Making Regarding Neonate Male Circumcision

Presenter Information

Erika Sutherland, Nursing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Sandra Van Gundy

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

In 2012, The American Academy of Pediatrics amended their circumcision policy statement to include that the current health benefits are not great enough for circumcision to be a routine procedure in all male neonates. They also state that prior to the procedure, the provider must provide parents with unbiased information. The parents are then left to make the decision based entirely on religious, ethical, cultural and aesthetic preferences with little regard to medical indications. A review of the literature reveals that providers of different specialties possess a different knowledge base regarding the risks and benefits of circumcision, therefore parents are receiving varying information dependent on their providers specialty. The literature also assesses the effect of various educational materials on the parent’s decision to circumcise their male neonate. The current literature suggests a need for further evaluation of other learning materials and methods and their effects on parental decisions regarding neonatal circumcision. A need for standardized education for the providers is needed for unbiased, un-varied information to be provided to parent.

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May 3rd, 4:00 PM May 3rd, 5:00 PM

The Effects of Parental Education on Decision Making Regarding Neonate Male Circumcision

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

In 2012, The American Academy of Pediatrics amended their circumcision policy statement to include that the current health benefits are not great enough for circumcision to be a routine procedure in all male neonates. They also state that prior to the procedure, the provider must provide parents with unbiased information. The parents are then left to make the decision based entirely on religious, ethical, cultural and aesthetic preferences with little regard to medical indications. A review of the literature reveals that providers of different specialties possess a different knowledge base regarding the risks and benefits of circumcision, therefore parents are receiving varying information dependent on their providers specialty. The literature also assesses the effect of various educational materials on the parent’s decision to circumcise their male neonate. The current literature suggests a need for further evaluation of other learning materials and methods and their effects on parental decisions regarding neonatal circumcision. A need for standardized education for the providers is needed for unbiased, un-varied information to be provided to parent.