Event Title

Burnout Prevalence in Intensive Care Unit Nurses

Presenter Information

Rachel Powers, Nursing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Sandra Van Gundy

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

The project explores research on the correlation between burnout rates in intensive care unit (ICU) nurses and the services that are offered in hospitals to combat burnout. Hospitals need to address this dilemma that impacts nurses, as well as implement plans to nurture and support to minimize burnout. The literature focused on questionnaires and screenings to evaluate nurses for burnout. Each study had different requirements that contributed to their definition of burnout, but contained similar descriptions. Other studies focused on the implementation of services in hospitals and the effect that it has retention rates in the ICU. After examining the literature, hospitals that have tools to prevent burnout lead to higher retention rates in nurses as well as decreased burnout. After reviewing the research, hospitals should implement a preventative program and have services to combat burnout readily accessible to support nurse’s work in the ICU.

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May 3rd, 4:00 PM May 3rd, 5:00 PM

Burnout Prevalence in Intensive Care Unit Nurses

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

The project explores research on the correlation between burnout rates in intensive care unit (ICU) nurses and the services that are offered in hospitals to combat burnout. Hospitals need to address this dilemma that impacts nurses, as well as implement plans to nurture and support to minimize burnout. The literature focused on questionnaires and screenings to evaluate nurses for burnout. Each study had different requirements that contributed to their definition of burnout, but contained similar descriptions. Other studies focused on the implementation of services in hospitals and the effect that it has retention rates in the ICU. After examining the literature, hospitals that have tools to prevent burnout lead to higher retention rates in nurses as well as decreased burnout. After reviewing the research, hospitals should implement a preventative program and have services to combat burnout readily accessible to support nurse’s work in the ICU.