Event Title

Lineage Diversification of Cypripedium acaule (Orchidaceae) Across New England

Presenter Information

Kayla Walazek, Biology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Diana Jolles

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Cypripedium acaule, also known as the pink lady’s slipper, is an iconic species of eastern North American forests. This species typically comes in at least two forms across its geographic range. Pink and white flowered forms of C. acaule stand out in New England, but little is known about genetic variation within the species. While most pollination studies on this species revolve around fruit set, how color differences might influence pollinator choices and reproductive success is unknown (to the best of our knowledge). Our study looks at whether or not there is evidence of lineage diversification or speciation in New England C. acaule. To do this, we analyzed genetic polymorphisms for samples collected across New England, using both fresh and herbarium specimens. We expected to see C. acaule split by either geographic structure (allopatric speciation) or color (sympatric speciation). If new taxa are discovered, it could shed new light on the reproductive biology and evolution of these plants, thus shifting conservation priorities to account for this diversity.

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May 3rd, 2:00 PM May 3rd, 3:00 PM

Lineage Diversification of Cypripedium acaule (Orchidaceae) Across New England

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Cypripedium acaule, also known as the pink lady’s slipper, is an iconic species of eastern North American forests. This species typically comes in at least two forms across its geographic range. Pink and white flowered forms of C. acaule stand out in New England, but little is known about genetic variation within the species. While most pollination studies on this species revolve around fruit set, how color differences might influence pollinator choices and reproductive success is unknown (to the best of our knowledge). Our study looks at whether or not there is evidence of lineage diversification or speciation in New England C. acaule. To do this, we analyzed genetic polymorphisms for samples collected across New England, using both fresh and herbarium specimens. We expected to see C. acaule split by either geographic structure (allopatric speciation) or color (sympatric speciation). If new taxa are discovered, it could shed new light on the reproductive biology and evolution of these plants, thus shifting conservation priorities to account for this diversity.