Event Title

Resuscitation and Recovery: Induced Therapeutic Hypothermia to Offset Brain Damage in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Patients

Presenter Information

Gabrielle Marchant, Nursing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Sandra Van Gundy

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

After being resuscitated during a sudden cardiac arrest, adult victims frequently experience brain damage during the recovery stage. This can change their lives drastically. Inducing a mild state of hypothermia has been thought to offset neurological injury caused by loss of circulating oxygen during cardiac arrest. Research results show a strong correlation between induced therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation following sudden cardiac arrest and improved neurologic function in comparison to those who did not receive hypothermic treatment. While inducing a mild hypothermic state can be ordered by a physician to treat cardiac arrest patients, nurses must have proper implementation skills as well as strong communication skills to successfully perform this procedure. This project will demonstrate how a nurse’s implementation may be improved as well as the preferred method of cooling in order to achieve the best patient outcome.

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May 3rd, 4:00 PM May 3rd, 5:00 PM

Resuscitation and Recovery: Induced Therapeutic Hypothermia to Offset Brain Damage in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Patients

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

After being resuscitated during a sudden cardiac arrest, adult victims frequently experience brain damage during the recovery stage. This can change their lives drastically. Inducing a mild state of hypothermia has been thought to offset neurological injury caused by loss of circulating oxygen during cardiac arrest. Research results show a strong correlation between induced therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation following sudden cardiac arrest and improved neurologic function in comparison to those who did not receive hypothermic treatment. While inducing a mild hypothermic state can be ordered by a physician to treat cardiac arrest patients, nurses must have proper implementation skills as well as strong communication skills to successfully perform this procedure. This project will demonstrate how a nurse’s implementation may be improved as well as the preferred method of cooling in order to achieve the best patient outcome.