Event Title

Silencing ALDH1B1 Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans in Order to Understand Alcohol Detoxification

Presenter Information

Daniel Shaw, Biology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Susan Swope

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

The gene ALDH1B1 plays a major role in ethanol detoxification. The protein which the gene codes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), catalyzes the oxidation of ethanol into acetaldehyde. Turning off the gene for the breakdown of alcohol in Caenorhabditis elegans will prevent alcohol dehydrogenation. This can be done using RNAi which will silence this gene. To examine these effects, we will compare the response of control and RNAi-treated worms to different alcohol concentrations. The short lifespan of C. elegans is useful in seeing the effects of alcohol over their lifetime. We expect that silencing the ADH gene will result in a buildup of alcohol in the treated worms and a buildup in acetaldehyde in the control worms which do not have the gene silenced. Erratic movements or death may be linked to the effect the alcohol on C. elegans nervous system. This is an important piece of research examining human biochemistry related to alcohol consmuption as 70% of the genes in C. elegans are homologous to H. sapiens.

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May 3rd, 2:00 PM May 3rd, 3:00 PM

Silencing ALDH1B1 Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans in Order to Understand Alcohol Detoxification

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

The gene ALDH1B1 plays a major role in ethanol detoxification. The protein which the gene codes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), catalyzes the oxidation of ethanol into acetaldehyde. Turning off the gene for the breakdown of alcohol in Caenorhabditis elegans will prevent alcohol dehydrogenation. This can be done using RNAi which will silence this gene. To examine these effects, we will compare the response of control and RNAi-treated worms to different alcohol concentrations. The short lifespan of C. elegans is useful in seeing the effects of alcohol over their lifetime. We expect that silencing the ADH gene will result in a buildup of alcohol in the treated worms and a buildup in acetaldehyde in the control worms which do not have the gene silenced. Erratic movements or death may be linked to the effect the alcohol on C. elegans nervous system. This is an important piece of research examining human biochemistry related to alcohol consmuption as 70% of the genes in C. elegans are homologous to H. sapiens.