Event Title

Effect of Variants on Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in a Cell Culture Model

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Heather Doherty

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

In the United States, more than 6 million people suffer from heart failure. A primary cause of heart failure is cardiac scarring following a heart attack. Some patients appear more prone to scarring than others, but we have no way of determining who is most likely to be affected. Characterization of genetic variants and an understanding of how these variants impact healing will allow for the identification of patients most in need of treatment. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a protein important to wound healing, and overexpression after a heart attack results in excess extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition, cardiac scarring, and often heart failure. We hypothesize that genetic variants in CTGF will impact its gene expression resulting in variations in wound healing in a tissue culture model. CTGF variants observed in the Plymouth State University population were inserted into mouse cells to study the relationship between variants and healing. Preliminary data suggest variants in the CTGF gene can influence wound healing behavior in a tissue culture model. Conclusions from our studies will help identify CTGF variants that may impact scarring risk or severity, leading to targeting of therapies to high risk patients.

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May 3rd, 2:00 PM May 3rd, 3:00 PM

Effect of Variants on Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in a Cell Culture Model

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

In the United States, more than 6 million people suffer from heart failure. A primary cause of heart failure is cardiac scarring following a heart attack. Some patients appear more prone to scarring than others, but we have no way of determining who is most likely to be affected. Characterization of genetic variants and an understanding of how these variants impact healing will allow for the identification of patients most in need of treatment. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a protein important to wound healing, and overexpression after a heart attack results in excess extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition, cardiac scarring, and often heart failure. We hypothesize that genetic variants in CTGF will impact its gene expression resulting in variations in wound healing in a tissue culture model. CTGF variants observed in the Plymouth State University population were inserted into mouse cells to study the relationship between variants and healing. Preliminary data suggest variants in the CTGF gene can influence wound healing behavior in a tissue culture model. Conclusions from our studies will help identify CTGF variants that may impact scarring risk or severity, leading to targeting of therapies to high risk patients.