Event Title

The effects of reminders on procrastination

Presenter Information

Colin Amoth, Psychology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Angela Kilb

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

5-3-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

5-3-2018 4:00 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to show how procrastination behaviors may or may not be affected by daily reminders from an authoritative figure. This research may be important in understanding the factors which can alleviate procrastination. The experiment will begin with a self-report survey of the individual's perceived levels of procrastination, using the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS). After these surveys have been collected, participants will be asked to write a 300-word essay over a relatively mundane topic, in this case this will be 'fish'. Half of the students in the experiment will receive email reminders every day for exactly a week (experimental group), while the other half will not (control group). The predictions of this researcher being that students not receiving the daily reminder will be more likely to procrastinate. Preliminary results will be presented.

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May 3rd, 3:00 PM May 3rd, 4:00 PM

The effects of reminders on procrastination

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

The purpose of this experiment is to show how procrastination behaviors may or may not be affected by daily reminders from an authoritative figure. This research may be important in understanding the factors which can alleviate procrastination. The experiment will begin with a self-report survey of the individual's perceived levels of procrastination, using the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS). After these surveys have been collected, participants will be asked to write a 300-word essay over a relatively mundane topic, in this case this will be 'fish'. Half of the students in the experiment will receive email reminders every day for exactly a week (experimental group), while the other half will not (control group). The predictions of this researcher being that students not receiving the daily reminder will be more likely to procrastinate. Preliminary results will be presented.