Event Title

Green and Fast Synthesis of Imines from Naturally Occurring Antibacterial Compounds

Presenter Information

Anthony Cestrone, Chemistry

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Anil Waghe

Abstract

Imines are precursors for synthesis of ligands, amines and heterocyclic compounds, and useful as antibacterial agents. Though various catalysts have been developed for carbonyl-primary amine condensation reactions, solvents and catalysts often prolong the workup process. Additionally, conventional methods require refluxing reaction mixtures for several hours, azeotropic distillation, and the use of drying agents. This is not only environmentally degrading but also time-consuming. In this poster we present a concise method which eliminates the need of solvent. The method was designed for energy efficiency by incorporating microwaves to supply heat and evaporate water. A concise and solvent-free approach was followed to synthesize a series of imines derived from naturally antibacterial compounds. The antibacterial activities of the subsequent products were assayed against B. cereus, and compared to those of the starting compounds.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

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May 2nd, 2:00 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Green and Fast Synthesis of Imines from Naturally Occurring Antibacterial Compounds

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Imines are precursors for synthesis of ligands, amines and heterocyclic compounds, and useful as antibacterial agents. Though various catalysts have been developed for carbonyl-primary amine condensation reactions, solvents and catalysts often prolong the workup process. Additionally, conventional methods require refluxing reaction mixtures for several hours, azeotropic distillation, and the use of drying agents. This is not only environmentally degrading but also time-consuming. In this poster we present a concise method which eliminates the need of solvent. The method was designed for energy efficiency by incorporating microwaves to supply heat and evaporate water. A concise and solvent-free approach was followed to synthesize a series of imines derived from naturally antibacterial compounds. The antibacterial activities of the subsequent products were assayed against B. cereus, and compared to those of the starting compounds.