Event Title

The Effects of Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants

Presenter Information

Olivia Dalessio, Nursing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jean Coffey

Abstract

Delayed cord clamping has been proven beneficial for preterm infants but can halt resuscitation. The purpose of the study is to compare umbilical cord milking with delayed cord clamping. This study involves umbilical cord milking defined as the process in which the provider gradual pushes remaining blood from umbilical cord into preterm infants (born < 37 weeks) immediately or for a duration of < 20 seconds. The method of this study was a literature search using Google Scholar and CINAHL with a total of 10 articles. Results show umbilical cord milking improves the overall health of the preterm newborn by decreasing the need for oxygen therapy at birth, improving hematocrit levels and decreasing the need for blood transfusions in comparison to delayed cord clamping. This is an easy intervention and has the potential to improve overall health in the neonate.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 5:00 PM

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May 2nd, 4:00 PM May 2nd, 5:00 PM

The Effects of Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Delayed cord clamping has been proven beneficial for preterm infants but can halt resuscitation. The purpose of the study is to compare umbilical cord milking with delayed cord clamping. This study involves umbilical cord milking defined as the process in which the provider gradual pushes remaining blood from umbilical cord into preterm infants (born < 37 weeks) immediately or for a duration of < 20 seconds. The method of this study was a literature search using Google Scholar and CINAHL with a total of 10 articles. Results show umbilical cord milking improves the overall health of the preterm newborn by decreasing the need for oxygen therapy at birth, improving hematocrit levels and decreasing the need for blood transfusions in comparison to delayed cord clamping. This is an easy intervention and has the potential to improve overall health in the neonate.