Event Title

Mount Washington Boundary Layer Project

Presenter Information

Stephen Durham, Meteorology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Eric Kelsey

Abstract

This study focuses on the vertical changes in air masses at the summit of Mount Washington, New Hampshire. The air masses at the summit of Mount Washington fluctuates between the boundary layer (BL), the free troposphere (FT), and the entrainment zone (ET). The BL height of the atmosphere is dependent upon meteorological factors such as insolation, synoptic scale events, and up sloping and down sloping processes (Bianca et al. 2011). The main purpose of this project was to look at how much did the maximum temperature change and the minimum dew point change when the air mass changed from the boundary layer to the lower part of the free troposphere during passage of a synoptic scale ridge. This research will examine a large number of cases examining the impacts of air mass changes on the daily maximum temperature and minimum dew-point temperatures. These results will help advance our knowledge of how vertical air mass changes impact alpine ecosystems and high elevation climate trends.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 4:00 PM

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May 2nd, 3:00 PM May 2nd, 4:00 PM

Mount Washington Boundary Layer Project

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

This study focuses on the vertical changes in air masses at the summit of Mount Washington, New Hampshire. The air masses at the summit of Mount Washington fluctuates between the boundary layer (BL), the free troposphere (FT), and the entrainment zone (ET). The BL height of the atmosphere is dependent upon meteorological factors such as insolation, synoptic scale events, and up sloping and down sloping processes (Bianca et al. 2011). The main purpose of this project was to look at how much did the maximum temperature change and the minimum dew point change when the air mass changed from the boundary layer to the lower part of the free troposphere during passage of a synoptic scale ridge. This research will examine a large number of cases examining the impacts of air mass changes on the daily maximum temperature and minimum dew-point temperatures. These results will help advance our knowledge of how vertical air mass changes impact alpine ecosystems and high elevation climate trends.