Event Title

The Effect of a Four-Week Beta Alanine Supplementation on Overall Performance in a 5 km Run

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ryanne Carmichael

Abstract

PURPOSE: When exercising, lactic acid causes hydrogen ion (H+) accumulation which decreases muscle function. Beta-alanine binds with L-histidine, forming carnosine, which buffers H+. The purpose of the study was to determine how beta-alanine supplementation (BA) affected blood lactate (BLa-) and 5 km run time. METHODS: A total of seven (age: 20 ± 1 year, height: 173 ± 4.7 cm, weight: 73.6 ± 10.3 kg, body fat: 13.7 ± 3.3%, and VO2 max: 51.8 ± 2.8 ml/kg/min) recreational male runners were randomly divided into two groups: beta-alanine (BA) and placebo (PL). Both groups consumed 3.2 g of beta-alanine or maltodextrin per day for 4 weeks. Baseline measurements consisted of a body composition measurement and VO2 max test. Subjects ran a 5 km distance before the supplementation period. After the supplementation period, subjects completed another 5 km run. BLa- was taken at rest and at the end of each run. HYPOTHESIS: Supplementing with beta-alanine will lower BLa- and decrease run time due to the buffering capacity that beta-alanine has on active muscles. CONCLUSION: Researchers have shown that BA can positively impact anaerobic performance. The current study will provide a better understanding of how BA affects aerobic exercise during a 5 km run.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 4:00 PM

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May 2nd, 3:00 PM May 2nd, 4:00 PM

The Effect of a Four-Week Beta Alanine Supplementation on Overall Performance in a 5 km Run

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

PURPOSE: When exercising, lactic acid causes hydrogen ion (H+) accumulation which decreases muscle function. Beta-alanine binds with L-histidine, forming carnosine, which buffers H+. The purpose of the study was to determine how beta-alanine supplementation (BA) affected blood lactate (BLa-) and 5 km run time. METHODS: A total of seven (age: 20 ± 1 year, height: 173 ± 4.7 cm, weight: 73.6 ± 10.3 kg, body fat: 13.7 ± 3.3%, and VO2 max: 51.8 ± 2.8 ml/kg/min) recreational male runners were randomly divided into two groups: beta-alanine (BA) and placebo (PL). Both groups consumed 3.2 g of beta-alanine or maltodextrin per day for 4 weeks. Baseline measurements consisted of a body composition measurement and VO2 max test. Subjects ran a 5 km distance before the supplementation period. After the supplementation period, subjects completed another 5 km run. BLa- was taken at rest and at the end of each run. HYPOTHESIS: Supplementing with beta-alanine will lower BLa- and decrease run time due to the buffering capacity that beta-alanine has on active muscles. CONCLUSION: Researchers have shown that BA can positively impact anaerobic performance. The current study will provide a better understanding of how BA affects aerobic exercise during a 5 km run.