Event Title

The Expressions of HSP70 Protein in Eastern Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) Exposing to Seasonal Water Temperature and Conductivity

Presenter Information

Bao Nguyen, Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Brigid O'Donnell, Amy Villamagna

Abstract

Populations of eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) have been significantly reduced due to climate change and historical human activities. Yet, knowledge about individual fish response to different stresses at a molecular level is limited. We documented the response of brook trout to a set of potential stressors by measuring the level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) using Western Blotting. Over three sampling events in June, July, and September of 2018, we collected non-lethal biopsies of gill filaments from a total of 75 fish across three tributaries (GR3, GR4, and GR5) in the Beebe River watershed (Campton, NH). We used non-linear regression to test the general relationship between HSP70 and temperature (1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day mean temperature). Multiple linear regression and linear mixed model analyses were employed to investigate the roles of exposure time to different temperature ranges, month of collection, stream depth, location of fish capture, mass, and total length on the variation in HPS70 expression. We found that HSP70 expression was best quadratically dependent on 7-day mean temperature (R2-adjusted = 56.70%, p<0.00001). Furthermore, larger fish (by weight) tended to have lower HSP70 expression (p=0.004). This study will contribute to the development of future stress-induced biomarker monitor.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 4:00 PM

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May 2nd, 3:00 PM May 2nd, 4:00 PM

The Expressions of HSP70 Protein in Eastern Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) Exposing to Seasonal Water Temperature and Conductivity

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Populations of eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) have been significantly reduced due to climate change and historical human activities. Yet, knowledge about individual fish response to different stresses at a molecular level is limited. We documented the response of brook trout to a set of potential stressors by measuring the level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) using Western Blotting. Over three sampling events in June, July, and September of 2018, we collected non-lethal biopsies of gill filaments from a total of 75 fish across three tributaries (GR3, GR4, and GR5) in the Beebe River watershed (Campton, NH). We used non-linear regression to test the general relationship between HSP70 and temperature (1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day mean temperature). Multiple linear regression and linear mixed model analyses were employed to investigate the roles of exposure time to different temperature ranges, month of collection, stream depth, location of fish capture, mass, and total length on the variation in HPS70 expression. We found that HSP70 expression was best quadratically dependent on 7-day mean temperature (R2-adjusted = 56.70%, p<0.00001). Furthermore, larger fish (by weight) tended to have lower HSP70 expression (p=0.004). This study will contribute to the development of future stress-induced biomarker monitor.