Event Title

Group-Selection Harvest Increases Avian Diversity

Presenter Information

Kelsey Pangman, M.S. Biology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Len Reitsma

Abstract

Early-successional species of songbirds and their associated habitat are in sharp decline especially in eastern North America. Intentional management for these species often recruits predators, invasive plants or nest parasites, depending on landscape context. Managing for early-successional species can potentially negatively affect late-successional species dependent on mature forest. Creating a mosaic of group-selections within mature mixed deciduous-coniferous forest, we increased abundance of early-successional species while limiting negative impact on the abundance or reproductive performance of forest-interior species. Through monitoring fledging success of three early-successional species and three late successional species we will assist in assessing habitat suitability of these species. A better understanding of how to best assist these early-successional species without jeopardizing forest-interior species using strategic timber harvest management strategies can potentially diversify bird communities by including habitat across the succession spectrum. More than half of New Hampshire is privately owned and thus landowners and forestry professionals can significantly facilitate increasing early-successional habitat without negatively impacting late-successional migratory birds.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 4:00 PM

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May 2nd, 3:00 PM May 2nd, 4:00 PM

Group-Selection Harvest Increases Avian Diversity

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Early-successional species of songbirds and their associated habitat are in sharp decline especially in eastern North America. Intentional management for these species often recruits predators, invasive plants or nest parasites, depending on landscape context. Managing for early-successional species can potentially negatively affect late-successional species dependent on mature forest. Creating a mosaic of group-selections within mature mixed deciduous-coniferous forest, we increased abundance of early-successional species while limiting negative impact on the abundance or reproductive performance of forest-interior species. Through monitoring fledging success of three early-successional species and three late successional species we will assist in assessing habitat suitability of these species. A better understanding of how to best assist these early-successional species without jeopardizing forest-interior species using strategic timber harvest management strategies can potentially diversify bird communities by including habitat across the succession spectrum. More than half of New Hampshire is privately owned and thus landowners and forestry professionals can significantly facilitate increasing early-successional habitat without negatively impacting late-successional migratory birds.