Event Title

African Americans and the management of diabetes mellitus under the veil of health disparities

Presenter Information

Lamienne Faverdieu, Nursing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jean Coffey

Abstract

African Americans are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes. They have higher prevalence rates, worse diabetes control, and higher rates of complications. As an African American, it is always noted that family members and other members of the community struggle to control their glucose level. The purpose of this research is to explore what is in the literature about the impact of health disparities in the management of diabetes mellitus in African Americans. A literature search using multiple databases indicate that diabetes has a greater prevalence rate among individuals who live in standard metropolitan areas, in the southern part of the United States, have lower than average educational attainment, and have annual family incomes below the poverty level. African American diabetic patients receive lower quality health care, are less well controlled, and consequently have a higher rate of complications than white diabetic patients. The prevalence of diabetes increased with increasing age and BMI, and with decreasing education and income.

Start Date

5-2-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

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May 2nd, 2:00 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

African Americans and the management of diabetes mellitus under the veil of health disparities

African Americans are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes. They have higher prevalence rates, worse diabetes control, and higher rates of complications. As an African American, it is always noted that family members and other members of the community struggle to control their glucose level. The purpose of this research is to explore what is in the literature about the impact of health disparities in the management of diabetes mellitus in African Americans. A literature search using multiple databases indicate that diabetes has a greater prevalence rate among individuals who live in standard metropolitan areas, in the southern part of the United States, have lower than average educational attainment, and have annual family incomes below the poverty level. African American diabetic patients receive lower quality health care, are less well controlled, and consequently have a higher rate of complications than white diabetic patients. The prevalence of diabetes increased with increasing age and BMI, and with decreasing education and income.