Event Title

Differences in Open-Canopy Foraging Behaviors that Influence Resource Partitioning Between Three Tyrannidae Species in Monteverde, Costa Rica

Presenter Information

James Canwell, Environmental Biology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Len Reitsma

Abstract

Animals that inhabit the same space will modify their behaviors to reduce competition. Coexisting flycatchers often differ in their foraging behaviors. Our study sites were pastures in and around the University of Georgia: Costa Rica in Monteverde. We analyzed foraging behaviors of three flycatcher species by recording: technique, prey size, perch height, and zone usage (parts of the pastures most frequented). We hypothesized that flycatchers would exhibit unique preferences in regards to technique, prey size, perch height, and zone usage, exhibiting resource partitioning. Tropical Kingbirds, Dusky-capped Flycatchers, and Social Flycatchers showed significant differences in foraging technique. Prey size choice was significantly different, mean size correlating with bill length for each species. There was a significant difference between the amount of times each bird visited each zone (core v periphery). The data showed a trend in the reduction of appearances of kingbirds moving out from the center zone contrasting with increased appearances of dusky-capped and social flycatchers in the outer zones. We saw no significant difference in perch height, but our findings suggest resource partitioning amongst the species. Our data corroborate previous studies and will provide better background into foraging behaviors of similar species.

Location

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Start Date

5-2-2019 3:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 4:00 PM

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May 2nd, 3:00 PM May 2nd, 4:00 PM

Differences in Open-Canopy Foraging Behaviors that Influence Resource Partitioning Between Three Tyrannidae Species in Monteverde, Costa Rica

Hartman Union Building Courtroom

Animals that inhabit the same space will modify their behaviors to reduce competition. Coexisting flycatchers often differ in their foraging behaviors. Our study sites were pastures in and around the University of Georgia: Costa Rica in Monteverde. We analyzed foraging behaviors of three flycatcher species by recording: technique, prey size, perch height, and zone usage (parts of the pastures most frequented). We hypothesized that flycatchers would exhibit unique preferences in regards to technique, prey size, perch height, and zone usage, exhibiting resource partitioning. Tropical Kingbirds, Dusky-capped Flycatchers, and Social Flycatchers showed significant differences in foraging technique. Prey size choice was significantly different, mean size correlating with bill length for each species. There was a significant difference between the amount of times each bird visited each zone (core v periphery). The data showed a trend in the reduction of appearances of kingbirds moving out from the center zone contrasting with increased appearances of dusky-capped and social flycatchers in the outer zones. We saw no significant difference in perch height, but our findings suggest resource partitioning amongst the species. Our data corroborate previous studies and will provide better background into foraging behaviors of similar species.